Mango Chaat Two Ways–Green and Ripe

Green Mango Chaat -- a crispy, tart, refreshing snack salad from India with cashews, green mango and sev (fried chickpea noodles)

I’ve owed you guys two more chaat recipes from that party, and I decided to combine them into one post since they are both mango chaats. One is made with green mango, mango picked when it has not begun to ripen AT ALL; and one is made with ripe, juicy, sweet mango. The sweet mango is my husband’s favorite chaat (of those I made); the green mango is my favorite–and it was devoured at the chaat party. I would say it is the one least familiar to Western taste buds, but it is absolutely fantastic and anyone open to giving it a chance is likely to be wowed.

Mango Chaat with Pumpkin Seeds: a crunchy, crispy, sweet and sour indian snack salad

The green mango chaat is more traditional–I mentioned in the first chaat post that I was inspired by Chai Pani in Asheville. They have a green mango chaat on their menu that is out of this world. Mine is not identical, but I was trying to emulate their flavors and textures when I composed the green mango chaat and I think I succeeded. If you have trouble finding green mango, I would try first for green papaya, and after that a really tart apple tossed in lime juice to prevent browning.

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With the ripe or sweet mango chaat I took a more unconventional route, using North American pepitas, or pumpkin seeds, for my “crunch” factor. I think they worked really well and made a great alternative for someone with nut allergies. The Mexican grown Ataúlfo mango is preferred for the salad, but any ripe mango will work–just choose one that gives slightly when pressed.  In both salads I soaked my diced red onion in cold water to tame the fumes that can cause stomach upset. One of my guests actually even took me aside to tell me how much he loved the green mango chaat, and he was surprised because he usually avoided raw onion.

As with all chaat recipes, everything is to taste. I have given ballpark estimates of the ingredients but if more or less of something sounds good to you, by all means try it that way. It is my understanding chaat is always ordered to taste in street markets in India.

Mango Chaat with Pumpkin Seeds: a crunchy, crispy, sweet and sour indian snack salad

Ripe Mango Chaat
 
Author:
Recipe type: snack
Cuisine: Indian
Ingredients
  • Dry ingredients:
  • ½ cup toasted and salted pumpkin seeds
  • ½ cup puffed wheat
  • 1 cup Udupi Bombay Mix*
  • Wet ingredients:
  • 4-5 cups diced ripe mango, preferably Ataúlfo
  • 1 cup grape or cherry tomatoes, quartered
  • ½ cup diced red onions, soaked in cold water for 15 mins and then drained
  • 2-4 T lime juice, to taste
  • ¼ cup chopped cilantro
  • 1-2 t chaat masala, to taste
  • cayenne pepper, optional, to taste
Instructions
  1. Toss the dry ingredients together. Set aside.
  2. In a larger bowl, toss the wet ingredients. Start with lesser amounts.
  3. Toss the wet and dry ingredients together. Taste for lime juice and chaat masala especially. Add cayenne pepper if you want it spicy. Serve immediately--the ripe mango is quite juicy and will make the salad limp if you wait.

 

Green Mango Chaat -- a crispy, tart, refreshing snack salad from India with cashews, green mango and sev (fried chickpea noodles)

Green Mango Chaat
 
Inspired by Chai Pani
Author:
Recipe type: snack
Cuisine: Indian
Ingredients
  • Dry mix:
  • ½ cup Ratlami Sev (fried spicy noodles made from legumes)*
  • ½ cup puffed rice
  • 1 cup coarsely chopped roasted and salted cashews or peanuts
  • Wet Mix:
  • 3 green mangoes, peeled and diced
  • ½ cup diced red onion, soaked in cold water for 15 mins and drained
  • 2-4 T chopped cilantro, to taste
  • 1-3 T fresh lime juice, to taste
  • 1-2 t chaat masala, to taste
Instructions
  1. Toss together the dry ingredients and set aside.
  2. In a separate bowl toss together the wet ingredients, starting with the lesser amounts. This chaat is not as juicy and can afford to sit a bit, but it is still best to plan to serve immediately.
  3. When you are ready to serve, toss the wet and dry ingredients together. Taste for more cilantro, lime juice and chaat masala.

 

*For the crunchy fried Indian “noodles” you should check an Indian grocer. If you have trouble finding them, you can buy the exact Udupi Bombay Mix I used in the sweet mango chaat at Amazon (that is an affiliate link). Amazon did not seem to have the exact Ratlami Sev that I used, but they do have other brands, such as this Mirch Masala Ratlami Sev. Be warned the Ratlami Sev is spicy (or mine was) but I still found it wonderful, not overwhelming.

 

I did use affiliate links in the above paragraph; I make a tiny percentage of anything you buy through those links but there is no cost to you. And I do highly recommend using the Indian fried noodles, wherever you happen to find them.

Comments

  1. says

    I think these might be my favorite of all the chaats you’ve posted, being a mango addict and all. Now, to find green mangoes. I’m on a mission!

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